Do not use window cleaner on leather upholstery

Category: Common Leather Problems, DIY, General, Home and Office, Leather Advice From the Pros

Discolored footrest from household cleaner Most people, myself included, think of window cleaner as being one of the mildest of all cleaners.  People consider it to be so mild they could use it on almost anything.  Unfortunately, you really cannot use window cleaner on leather upholstery because almost all of it contains alcohol. Alcohol will damage the surface of your leather, especially breaking down the protective top coat on fully... [read more...]

Don’t use finger nail polish remover to remove marks on leather upholstery

Category: Common Leather Problems, DIY, Home and Office, Leather Advice From the Pros

It’s true that finger nail polish will remove marks on leather upholstery, but it also removes the dyes that are supposed to be on the leather, leaving a bleached out spot on your leather’s surface.  Finger nail polish also wears down the top coat on fully-finished leathers, leaving them more susceptible to damage. There are a number of other home remedies and wives’ tales about usin... [read more...]

Do not use disposable cleaning supplies or baby wipes on leather upholstery

Category: Common Leather Problems, DIY, Home and Office, Leather Advice From the Pros

Disposable cleaning supplies and baby wipes are so handy that people have started using them to clean everything, leather upholstery included.  I urge you not to use them because, though you may not be able to see the damage immediately, these disposable cleaning supplies typically cause damage to the surface of your leather, often leaving them discolored and more susceptible to damage in the lon... [read more...]

Do not use shoe polish on leather upholstery

Category: Common Leather Problems, DIY, Leather Advice From the Pros

Do not use shoe polish to touch up furniture It is a common mistake to use shoe polish on leather upholstery.  People try to use it on furniture and on their leather car seats, but it doesn’t work. The leather used in upholstery is tanned differently from the leather in shoes.  It does not soak up shoe polish like shoes do, so the polish will just sit on the surface of your leather and make a sticky mess. Depending on the type ... [read more...]

Old wives’ tales to repair leather furniture

Category: DIY, Leather Advice From the Pros

There are dozens and dozens of old wives’ tales on different household products that can be used to clean and repair leather.  Heed my advice – don’t use any of the following products on your leather furniture!  I’ve seen countless pieces of furniture ruined by these very things and wouldn’t want you to find yourself in the same predicament. 1. Olive oil: Lots of people use olive oi... [read more...]

Leather furniture cleaning and repair product guide

Category: Common Leather Problems, DIY, Home and Office, Leather Advice From the Pros

When it comes to repairing and caring for leather furniture, there are hundreds of options.  Furniture stores and online retailers offer up products that do everything from cleaning to dying leather.  However, you should proceed with extreme caution when you use these DIY products on your furniture.  I’ve heard and seen the effects of horror stories where these products ruined people’s leat... [read more...]

How to prevent sun damage to leather furniture

Category: Home and Office, Leather Advice From the Pros

Leather furniture and upholstery will inevitably face some wear and tear throughout its life, and there are many types of damage you can’t avoid. However, sun damage is one problem that can definitely be prevented. Too much sunlight and heat will fade and/or dry out your leather. Faded Leather Fading is commonly seen in semi-aniline and aniline leathers, and it is less common in fully-fini... [read more...]

How to clean vinyl boat seats

Category: Cars, boats and planes, DIY, Vinyl Advice From the Pros

Vinyl is an incredibly durable material, and it holds up well to water exposure.  Because of its durability, the vast majority of cushioned boat seats are made of vinyl.  While vinyl is designed to hold up well to wear and tear, it does have its limits. Time itself can take a major toll on vinyl if you don’t care for it properly.  It is important to clean your vinyl well on a regular basis, n... [read more...]

How to clean mildew off your boat seats

Category: Cars, boats and planes, DIY, Vinyl Advice From the Pros

Mildew is one of the most common problems with vinyl boat seats.  It often grows on seats when boats are covered because it thrives in warm, dark, damp places.  Mildew ends up smelling and looking bad, and it can eventually break down the vinyl your seats are made of.  It’s best to take measures to prevent it whenever possible and clean it up quickly once you realize it’s become a problem. ... [read more...]

How to clean tree sap off your boat seats

Category: Cars, boats and planes, DIY, Vinyl Advice From the Pros

Tree sap is one of the most common causes of damage to vinyl boat seats.  It can get on vinyl seats while the boat is uncovered or if a small portion of the cover comes loose, exposing the vinyl. The real problem with tree sap is that it melts easily into the seats in the sun or hot weather, making it next to impossible to clean off.  It is best to take preventative measures to keep tree sap ... [read more...]